Adelaide’s Advertiser celebrates 160th anniversary

The Advertiser will reach its 160-year milestone on Thursday, July 12, and in the lead up to the anniversary, will share significant events that shaped South Australia and the rest of the world over 16 decades, through a pictorially-led print and digital content campaign.

The South Australian metro newspaper will roll out decade-by-decade eight-page lift-outs and digital photo galleries showcasing images of the state’s past, sharing stories of notable moments.

“Over 160 years we have borne witness to the triumphs and the tragedies which have come to define South Australia,” said Matt Deighton, editor of The Advertiser.

“And today, The Advertiser has evolved to become an iconic South Australian brand covering local, national and global news to keep our 502,000 weekly readers informed.”

The front page of of The Advertiser’s first edition.

A promotional front page as part of the campaign.

Since its first edition was published in 1858 as a broadsheet and consisting of only four pages, The Advertiser has now garnered the strongest readership rate for any print and digital news brand in the country with three in four South Australians reading each month.

Despite the masthead’s transformation into what is now a 24/7 multimedia organisation, Mr Deighton said one thing remains constant: the determination to better the lives of South Australians.

“It is for this reason I am so proud to be celebrating our rich 160-year heritage and commit to continue telling the stories that matter. The stories of South Australians.”

Managing director of News Corp in South Australia, Ish Davies, praised large and local businesses for their ongoing support, “whose investment in The Advertiser has and continues to allow our brands to play the role of informing, inspiring and advocating for our community as we do”.

Brand South Australia, Training and Skill Commission of SA and Foodland SA are some of the advertisers and sponsors of the 160th birthday campaign.

On July 12, 2018, The Advertiser will use type faces of the 1850s on its website to showcase modern news in an old-time format.