Google training head tells MFA 5+ to shoot for the moon

Google head of agency training Nathan Guerra and Vivid Ideas festival director Jess Scully speak at the MFA 5+ Inspiration Series

Google head of agency training Nathan Guerra and Vivid Ideas festival director Jess Scully speak at the MFA 5+ Inspiration Series

Media professionals trying to overcome great challenges should consider a technique dubbed Moonshot Thinking, Google head of agency training Nathan Guerra told the Media Federation of Australia’s 5+ Inspiration Series event at The Ivy this week.

The focus of the event was “harnessing innovation and creativity”.

Mr Guerra works with media agencies to help assist with their campaigns and adapt to the challenges of the digital landscape. He said the main element of “Moonshot Thinking” is aiming for a solution that can deliver a 10-fold improvement, rather than incremental, 10 per cent solutions.

“Ten times thinking is about making something 10 times better. Because this forces us to think more laterally, it is often no more difficult than making something 10 per cent better,” he said.

Mr Guerra cited the example of Google’s driverless cars. He said safety technology like seatbelts and airbags can reduce road-related deaths, but removing human drivers entirely – who cause around 95 per cent of accidents via human error – is the “10 times solution”.

This type of thinking and solution can also lead to unforeseen flow-on effects, which can greatly assist media professionals working in the increasingly challenging marketing industry.

MFA’s Inspiration Series are held around four times a year and designed to inspire media professionals to create and lead successful careers. The events are supported by The Newspaper Works.

Media professionals applaud Nathan Guerra and Jess Scully at the MFA 5+ Inspiration Series event.

Media professionals applaud Nathan Guerra and Jess Scully at the MFA 5+ Inspiration Series event.

Vivid Ideas festival director Jess Scully also spoke at this week’s event.

Mr Scully canvassed a number of marketing and installation projects that effectively utilised public space and the idea of a “multiplayer” world where strangers interact to create a shared experience.

“For the most part the things that work about those multiplayer projects that I showed is that they’re not about the brand or the story. Those things are incidental,” Ms Scully said.

“What is primary … is an experience and an emotion that is related to people expressing themselves personally or having a connection with someone else that happens to have a synergy with the brand, experience or the feeling that that brand is trying to engender.”

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