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Advertising and Anzac Day

Protection of Word ‘ANZAC’ Regulations were made in 1921 under the War Precautions Act Repeal Act 1920 to protect the word ‘ANZAC’, and any word which resembles it, from inappropriate use.

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Uses allowed under the regulations

While most uses of the word ‘ANZAC’ require the authority of the Minister for Veterans’ Affairs, THERE IS AN EXCEPTION under the Regulations…

  • the use of the words ‘ANZAC Day’ in connection with an entertainment held on 25 April itself or on consecutive days including 25 April.

Under the Regulations an entertainment is defined as including ‘… any exhibition, performance, lecture, amusement, game, sport or social gathering held or conducted from the purpose of raising money.’

In all other cases the Minister considers the merits of each individual application in deciding whether to approve a particular use.

Frequently declined uses of the word ‘Anzac’

The following are examples of applications to use the word ‘Anzac’ that would generally be declined due to their commercial or inappropriate nature…

  • fundraising initiatives with no ex-service organisation links
  • events or products associated with gambling
  • merchandise not intended to raise funds for an ex-service organisation or charity.

ANZAC or Anzac?

It is generally advised that ‘ANZAC’ should be used when referring to the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps.  For other, more modern usages of the word (Anzac Day, Anzac Spirit, Anzac Centenary etc.), the Department of Veterans’ Affairs recommends ‘Anzac’.

What about the Rising Sun Badge?

The Rising Sun Badge is an official emblem of the Australian Army and, as a result, is protected under the Defence Act 1903. To use the Rising Sun, and any other emblems relating to the Australian Defence Force, permission is required.

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