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Tune into improved frequency and reach with TV and newspapers

In an age when digital platforms are taking more than their fair share of ad spend and delivering less than ideal results, advertisers are increasingly turning back to traditional media. In part one of NewsMediaWorks’ special cross media report series, we explore the benefits of combining newspapers and television and how it can deliver results.

Television is a comfortable medium for advertisers. In the first half of 2017, the total Australian television market amassed $2.17 billion in ad revenue. ThinkTV figures released in February showed that despite the medium’s total revenues declining 0.7 per cent compared to the previous six months, some free-to-air and broadcast video on demand markets improved substantially.

Combining television’s attractiveness with newspapers has shown to improve advertising efficiencies, also adding reach and frequency to campaigns. Fourteen per cent of readers are strong newspaper readers but not strong consumers of TV – these readers provide additional reach for TV advertisers while 41 per cent of readers are strong newspaper readers who are also strong consumers of TV – these readers provide additional frequency. Fifty-five per cent of the 12.4 million newspaper readers are highly engaged, providing extra value for TV advertisers.

REGIONAL

Regional newspapers offer advertisers an engaged audience, with 15 per cent of readers providing more reach and 46 per cent higher frequency. The newspaper channel reaches 2.9 million people outside of major metro centres, of whom 1.3 million are strong consumers of television and newspapers. Fifteen per cent (450,000) of readers are strong consumers of newspapers but not TV.

Higher efficiencies for reach and frequency are most seen among those aged over 55 and homeowners. Of the readers providing extra frequency, 58 per cent of them are male while 46 per cent of them are home owners – these are the key skews when compared to the population aged 14+. For those readers who represent additional reach, the skew is aged 55 and over (37 per cent) and home owners (32 per cent).

COMMUNITY

Of the 3 million readers engaging with community mastheads within major metros, 1.4 million (46 per cent) are strong newspaper and television consumers providing additional frequency. Combining the two mediums also improves campaign reach, with research showing that 431,000 (15 per cent) are strong newspaper readers but do not watch much television.

Additional reach can best be achieved by appealing to the demographic skews of Community newspaper readers. Of those readers who are strong newspaper readers but not TV viewers, 39 per cent are over 55’s, 35 per cent are social grade A, 49 per cent tertiary educated and 37 per cent have a household income of more than $120,000 per annum. For additional frequency, compared to the population aged 14+, the readership skews over 55 (61 per cent) and home owners (46 per cent).

METROPOLITAN

With the scale of the channels’ audiences and readers, metropolitan and national readers demonstrate the highest potential compared to other channels.

Television ad revenues for metropolitan free-to-air increased by 1.4 per cent to $1.5 billion in the second half of 2017. Appealing to the six million metro newspaper readers can complement television campaigns. 16 per cent of metropolitan newspaper readers provide advertisers with additional reach – that’s 941,000 strong newspaper readers who don’t watch much television. Advertisers also benefit from 2.7 million metro newspaper readers (44 per cent) who are strong readers while also strongly engaged with television – they provide additional frequency.

In terms of demographics, advertisers looking for additional reach should recognise that these metro readers skew male (57 per cent), social grade A (35 per cent), tertiary educated (50 per cent) and have a household income of more than $120,000 per annum (39 per cent) – these demographs are over represented compared to the population aged 14+.

Additional frequency is best achieved by appealing to the demograph skews of over 55 (57 per cent), homeowners (42 per cent), social grade A (27 per cent), tertiary educated (39 per cent) and those with a household income of more than $120,000 per annum (31 per cent).

NATIONAL

National newspapers reach 2.4 million readers nationwide. Combining with TV, advertisers find 1.2 million readers (47 per cent) who are strong paper and television consumers offering improved frequency. Furthermore, additional reach is achieved by 598,000 readers (24 per cent) who are strong newspaper consumers but not television.

National newspapers showed some of the strongest demograph skews compared to the other three newspaper channels. For additional reach, advertisers should not look past the audience skews of male (63 per cent), social grade A (47 per cent), tertiary educated (62 per cent) and those with a household income of more than $120,000 per annum (43 per cent).

Home owners (44 per cent) is one of the demographs that exhibits strong skews across the readers who provide improved frequency. This segment also skews on social grade A (39 per cent), tertiary educated (54 per cent) and household income of more than $120,000 per annum (39 per cent).

BUYER GRAPHICS

Across all newspapers, those offering additional reach are 30 per cent more likely to attend a classical performance or travel business class and 20 per cent more likely to go to a professional sports match. Alternatively, those offering additional frequency are more likely to travel business class (22 per cent), intend to buy a car (20 per cent) or seek professional advice when investing money (19 per cent).

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